(Source: animated-disney-gifs, via moon-rise-girl)

(Source: peachybeam)

october-glory:

truth about september » FALL IS ALMOST HERE PEOPLE.

october-glory:

truth about september » FALL IS ALMOST HERE PEOPLE.

(via princess-ghostling)

Youtube is one of thee scariest and most pitiful places I’ve ever seen on the internet imo. D:

1 note   |   Reblog
bats-n-cats:

☆。*☽Halloween Haven☾*。☆

bats-n-cats:

☆。*☽Halloween Haven☾*。☆

(Source: sarahseeandersen, via gwyn-eira)

beautefragile:

Belle fleur de lis

beautefragile:

Belle fleur de lis

(via moon-rise-girl)

nalinnali:

#painting
8 notes   |   Reblog

nalinnali:

#painting

(Source: werebutterfly)


Bindi can usually be described as a traditional red circular mark or dot worn by the Indian women on their forehead. When this is accompanied by a vermillion mark on the parting of hair just above the forehead, it indicates that the particular lady is married. The term ‘bindi’ is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘bindu’ meaning “a drop or a small dot or particle”. Even though traditionally, bindi is a red colored dot, it can be worn in other colors also, like yellow, orange and so on. The shape and size of the bindi can also vary. Conventionally, it’s the Hindu married women who wear bindi. But, this mark can have several meanings and so, you may also see unmarried girls and even children wearing it. It’s the occasion, the color of the bindi and its shape that determines what it denotes. The customary bindi is made with red sindoor powder. The bindi is called the tilak when it’s applied on the forehead of a person, at the conclusion of a religious function or havan. The purpose of wearing a bindi can also vary. If it covers the entire forehead in three horizontal lines, then it denotes the wearer is an ascetic or belongs to a particular sect (like Brahmin). Sometimes, the bindi is used for mere beautification purpose by females. In this case, you may also find her wearing a small jewelry instead of the typical red dot. Though in India, a widow cannot wear a vermillion, she is free to sport a bindi. Bindi is called by different names in different languages of India. Thus, alternative names for bindi is Pottu in Tamil and Malayalam, Tilak in Hindi, Bottu or Tilakam in Telugu, Bottu or Tilaka in Kannada and Teep meaning “a pressing” in Bengali. Sometimes, the terms sindoor, kumkum, or kasturi are used depending upon the ingredients used in making the Bindi mark.
source

Bindi can usually be described as a traditional red circular mark or dot worn by the Indian women on their forehead. When this is accompanied by a vermillion mark on the parting of hair just above the forehead, it indicates that the particular lady is married. The term ‘bindi’ is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘bindu’ meaning “a drop or a small dot or particle”. Even though traditionally, bindi is a red colored dot, it can be worn in other colors also, like yellow, orange and so on. The shape and size of the bindi can also vary.

Conventionally, it’s the Hindu married women who wear bindi. But, this mark can have several meanings and so, you may also see unmarried girls and even children wearing it. It’s the occasion, the color of the bindi and its shape that determines what it denotes. The customary bindi is made with red sindoor powder. The bindi is called the tilak when it’s applied on the forehead of a person, at the conclusion of a religious function or havan.

The purpose of wearing a bindi can also vary. If it covers the entire forehead in three horizontal lines, then it denotes the wearer is an ascetic or belongs to a particular sect (like Brahmin). Sometimes, the bindi is used for mere beautification purpose by females. In this case, you may also find her wearing a small jewelry instead of the typical red dot. Though in India, a widow cannot wear a vermillion, she is free to sport a bindi.

Bindi is called by different names in different languages of India. Thus, alternative names for bindi is Pottu in Tamil and Malayalam, Tilak in Hindi, Bottu or Tilakam in Telugu, Bottu or Tilaka in Kannada and Teep meaning “a pressing” in Bengali. Sometimes, the terms sindoor, kumkum, or kasturi are used depending upon the ingredients used in making the Bindi mark.

source

(Source: punkbath, via moon-rise-girl)

Once you get this you have to say five things you like about yourself, publicly, then send this to ten of your favourite followers (non-negotiable)! by enchantedfox

Oh boy, I haven’t thought of nice things that I like about myself recently, but I’ll give it a go~ :)

1. I like my wisdom, it usually helps people I care about.
2. I like my eyes, they’re very big when I’m not wearing my glasses.
3. I like my spirit, at the darkest of times it surprises me that I can be strong.
4. I like my drawing skills, even if it isn’t the best, I like it for what it is, and how it makes people happy.
5. I like but more importantly love all my friends, they are so strong and that strength reminds me to happy in life and remember the important things again, they always keep my feet grounded, I’m so fortunate to have such lovely people in life. :3

This was really nice, thank you dear for sending me this, I feel all fluffy and happy now. :3

I feel small; but so are stars from a distance.  —Unknown (via ma-demoiselle-cherie)

(Source: somniloquencee, via littlesugarplumfairy)